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October 2019

MLRC Bulletin 2019 Issue 2

PUBLICATION:
in this issue

Roundtable: The Prosecution of Julian Assange

By Susan Buckley, James Goodale, Lynn Oberlander & Gabe Rottman* Is the Espionage Act prosecution of Julian Assange a first step in a plan to prosecute the mainstream media for publishing leaks? Susan Buckley: If I’ve learned anything over the course of the last two-and-a-half years, it is that trying to predict the plans of…

Network Enforcement Act

By Prof. Dr. Jan Hegemann, Dr. Jan Sorge* Background In order to move social networks to a faster and more comprehensive handling of complaints about hate crimes and other criminal content, the German legislator enacted the Network Enforcement Act in September 2017. Based on the view that voluntary com- mitments of the social networks were…

Thinking of the Children – The Regulatory War Over Unquantifiable ‘Harms’ Continues to Rage in the Digital Age

How the UK came to have some of the strictest online content laws in the Western World, and an examination of the Global trends toward tighter regulation of online content By Claire Hindle and Raoul Lumb* The Digital Economy Act – Public Guardian or State Oppressor? Did you know that the UK has, sitting on…

Reflections in a Rear-View Mirror – The Regulation of Social Media

By Dr. Harry Melkonian* Introduction When driving, while looking forward, we also periodically scan the rear-view mirror. But driving by the rear-view mirror alone is foolhardy and inevitably will result in a collision. What is foolhardy for the driver, is also reckless for the lawmaker. Yet, that is exactly how we design laws for the…

Media Law Developments: Australia in 2019

By Peter Bartlett and Tess McGuire* Freedom of the press, and the broader media law landscape has recently been under an intense spotlight in Australia. It has been tumultuous, and at times, troubling, as problematic judicial decisions have been handed down, criminal prosecution of journalists pursued, and substantive reform yet to be enacted. This Paper…

Re-Examining Defamation Law in a Digital Age: The Landscape of Law Reform in Ontario

By Andrea Gonsalves and Pam Hrick* Introduction The ubiquity of the internet has posed challenges for the development of defamation law. Communication lies at the core of the tort of defamation. The digital revolution has fundamentally altered the way people communicate, necessitating deep re-evaluations of defamation law principles developed in a bygone era. In recent…

Why Are the British Not More British?

Reflections on the London Conference since 1998 and the Underlying Philosophical Differences between U.S., U.K. and ECHR Law on Freedom of Expression By David S. Korzenik* I.  THE RECURRENT THEME OF THE LONDON CONFERENCE The First London Conference of 1998 – The Dark Cloud over the Hall The first MLRC London Conference gathered in 1998….

International Media Law Developments

 Download Publication Why Are the British Not More British?Reflections on the London Conference since 1998 and the Underlying Philosophical Differences between U.S., U.K. and ECHR Law on Freedom of ExpressionDavid S. Korzenik Re-Examining Defamation Law in a Digital Age: The Landscape of Law Reform in OntarioAndrea Gonsalves and Pam Hrick Media Law Developments: Australia in…